How the Underdog Became the Overachiever.

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Meticulous; Perfectionist; Multi-talented; Overachiever! There are the words many use to describe me. Many believe my work ethic and competitive nature come from being the middle child and the only male child in my family. People say being a middle child I had to fight for my parents’ attention which made me work harder and compete with my sisters. This couldn’t be farther from the truth.

Attention is something I never craved. This is over reason I’ve never been comfortable talking about my accomplishments, and why I shy away from the spotlight. Truth is I have always marched to my own beat. As a child and now, I enjoy spending most of my time alone.

My competitiveness is probably a balance of genetics and something I was taught. For many reasons I have always been counted out, doubted, or looked down upon. I was always the smallest kid when playing sports, so most of the time I was picked last and picked on.  Although, I was very smart in school and had a high IQ (gifted area), I struggled with reading and had speech issues.  I remember being pulled out of class to meet with my speech specialist. I dreaded reading out loud in class because I was sure to get laughed at.

Overcoming challenges is in my blood. I overcame my challenges by accepting that I was the underdog. When I was four or five years old, my dad told me I had to work 10 times as hard in order to be accepted in this world. I took what he told me and an attitude of being slighted with me in every situation I faced. Every slight, joke, or doubt anyone cast upon me fueled me. When people didn’t pick me for a sport, I worked hard for many hours; working on multiple skills in that sport. When I became one of the best, I worked even harder, telling myself that others still doubt me.  I read tirelessly and I practiced my speaking endlessly, in order to improve my reading and speech problems.

When I reached high school my guidance counselor told my mom that I wasn’t “smart enough” to participate in advanced academic classes (college prep and AP classes). My mom told me, “You have to prove her wrong”.  She didn’t have to tell me this; I was already dialed in from the moment I heard the phrase, “isn’t smart enough”.  Once again I was being slighted. What was my response? I took interest in any and everything, just to prove how smart I was.

I would finish my work so fast that I would get bored and disrupt the class by talking or walking the halls. I rarely took home homework. My parents, teachers, and friends wondered how I was able to get great grades, be involved in extracurricular activities, and still hang out with my friends; yet I hardly seemed to crack open a book.  I had a secret; my visualization and memorialization skills were above average. All I had to do was to look at something, focus on what I saw for a few moments, and I would remember the image. Due to this, I was able to solve problems and answer questions very quickly. Sometimes too quickly; which led me to miss a plus/minus sign in a math answer or a word when writing.

I applied this skill to everything I did. I basketball, all I had to do is see someone do a move once, visualized myself doing it in slow motion, and then I was able to do the same exact move. Sometimes even faster and better than the person who performed the move. While others slept or partied, I planned, researched, and visualized.  I outworked everyone. I am multi-talented and I accomplished all that I set out to do, because I am very meticulous in my learning process and practice. I am a perfectionist, so I stay up late thinking of ways to improve something or ways to accomplish something in the most efficient way possible. Often, simple blunders will cause me to stay up because I want to figure out why I messed up and how to fix it so it will not happen again.

I push myself to limits that few people dare to push themselves. I can do this because I am willing to work harder, smarter, and more efficient than most people. The words “you can’t” or “you will never”, sticks in my head. Those words ring in my head and because of this I push harder and harder. This is the reason I move in silence and hardly advertise my accomplishments.  Also, because of the doubt thrust upon me, I will never doubt or tell anyone what they can’t achieve.

I am a so called “mover and shaker” because I was blessed with so many God-given abilities; it is my due to use them to the best of my capability. I am an Overachiever because I am the underdog.

 

Vid Lamonte’ Buggs Jr is the author of You Ain’t Hungry Until I’m Starving. Copyright© 2016 http://www.vidbuggs.com. Copyright © 2016 http://www.4-U-NiquePublishing.com. Material is copyrighted but free to repost with proper listed credit, including our website addresses.